VMworld 2014: General Session – Monday

Here is a really good overview of the 1st general session at VMWorld 2014. Great things on deck. VSphere 6.0 Beta & SRM have my full attention.

SnowVM

The first general session for this year’s VMworld just finished and brought us some interesting announcements and provided new and returning VMworld visitors insight into the vision and strategy of VMware. More then 400 unique sessions will be given this year!

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Getting More Women Into Tech Is Going To Be Awkward

It will be difficult, but not impossible to get more women in tech. I’m very hopeful about the prospects.

TechCrunch

Big tech companies are pushing hard to get the word out about their efforts to be more inclusive for women, people of color, and other minority groups.

We recently covered Google’s latest efforts to get women involved in tech, including sending “at least one person each” to upcoming tech conferences via a new scholarship program and committing $50 million over three years to a massive new initiative to get girls into coding.

These are only early efforts. The demographic imbalance in the tech industry is so embedded in its culture that it will likely take years for the initiatives to propagate into wider network effects. The actual interactions between people who’ve been affected by these initiatives is what will lead to more women earning technical degrees and a decline in the rampant “dude-bro” mentality at industry events.

Until that happens, things are going to be awkward. As Google CodeJam Project Manager Emily Miller…

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Reclaiming disk space from “system volume information”

File this one under “Good to know!”

Thoughts On The Spot

Often seen and felt as a stupid problem in Windows (especially in Vista, as usual) is the habit of the strange entity called “system volume information” in C drive claiming a lot of disk space for apparently no practical purpose at all! You’d start off with a pretty neat 40 GB drive, and slowly over months you’d notice that you are only left with 5 GB in there whilst all your files summed up could only answer for 15 GB and the Windows+Program Files would be around another 10 GB. Where did the rest of the 10 GB vanish? The answer would be the hidden folder called “system volume information” (let’s call it SVI for ease of my typing). Seemingly windows saves information related to system restore inside that place and it is used when you actually perform a restoration (which is indeed a great facility). But when struggling for…

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Google Brings Its Apps Admin App To iOS

This is pretty sweet!

Nice that Google developed the app for iOS too! I can’t wait to try it out. If you have used it on either platform, please let me know your thoughts.

One more tool in the 24×7 admin arsenal.

TechCrunch

About a year ago, Google launched an Android app that allows Google Apps administrators to manage their users and services right from their Android phones and tablets. Today, it is bringing this app to iOS, too.

Google Admin for iOS offers the same kind of features as the Android app, which means you’ll be able to create and manage users, reset passwords, edit profiles and suspend users right from your iPhone and iPad. The tool also allows you to manage groups and review account activities. In addition, Google Apps for Business admins can use the app to contact Google support.

Just like with the Android app, admins have to ensure that they have API access enabled. As far as I can tell, there aren’t any major differences between the iOS and Android app. Still, not every Google Apps admin is on Android, so it’s good to see that Google has…

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Adding space to a vDisk on a PERC 5/i Controller Part 3 of 3

To Grow the C:\ Drive

This is part 3 of the “Adding space to a vDisk on a PERC 5/i Controller” post.

Back to Part 1 or Part 2.

Growing the system partition is a much more elaborate task. Download gparted (do not use 0.15.0, it’s buggy) and burn the ISO to disk. Make sure you have a full system backup before performing any disk modifications. Yes, that means YOU if this a production system.

Reboot the system with the gparted ISO in the drive. Press the enter key when you get to the boot screen. Follow remaining prompts to get you to the GUI. When asked which mode do you prefer, press 0 then enter.

gparted-1

  • Review the partitions and the familiarize yourself with your disk layout. Note which partition is the boot partition. For Windows, that is your C:\ drive. In this example, C:\ is /dev/sda2 and D:\ is inside the extended partition, /dev/sda5
  • Now this is where it gets tricky. Here I shrunk the /dev/sda5 partition from the left to add space to the beginning of the partition. Then I shrunk /dev/sda3 (the extended partition). Lastly, I grew the C:\ drive partition, /dev/sda2.

gparted-resize

gparted-resize2

gparted-resize3

gparted-resize4

  • Notice the several unallocated slices between the partitions, these occur when you have cylinder aligned and MiB aligned partitions on the same disk. Also, notice the unallocated space at the end of the partition (like when we started) this will taken care of in Windows, however we could handle it hear, but it seems quicker to do from the OS.
  • Once your partitions appear as you like them to, click Apply. This will queue up all 3 disk operations to disk. Depending on the size of your disk, this may take some time.
  • Click Details for more information about what’s happening.

gparted-apply

  • Once the operations are complete, click close.

gparted-done

  • Reboot the server and remove the CD.  Your system will run a check disk on C:\ (and maybe D:\). Let it complete and allow the system to boot to windows
  • When your system boots up, open Disk Management and view the newly sized C:\ and D:\. Note the unallocated space still on the end of the drive. Also note, D:\ no longer has a drive letter. Reassign the same drive letter.

diskmgmt-unallocated3

  • Now Run dis part and extend the volume.
  • Enter #List DISK
  • Enter #LIST VOLUME
  • Enter #SELECT VOLUME #
  • Enter #EXTEND. This will take all available space and use it to extend the partition.
  • Reboot the server and allow for another check disk to run. This time it will be for the D:\ drive. Depending on the size of the drive, this may take some time.
  • Once the server reboots, open up disk management and review the disk layout.

diskmgmt-done